Archive for the ‘Stock Tips’ Category

Before you invest or pay for any investment advice, make sure your brokers, investment advisers, and investment adviser representatives are licensed. Always check and see if they or their firms have had run-ins with regulators or other investors. Continue
When people from the securities industry call to sell you something, they have to follow some guidelines Continue

FIXED-INCOME

Question: What are fixed-income securities? Answer: Fixed-income securities are financial instruments that:
  • provide interest earnings and the return of principal at maturity, and
  • involve an investor loaning money to a government entity or a corporation for a specified time.
Interest
You purchase a variable annuity with an initial purchase payment of $10,000. You allocate 50% of that purchase payment ($5,000) to a bond fund, and 50% ($5,000) to a stock fund. Continue
This is a general description of variable annuities – what they are, how they work, and the charges you will pay. Continue
An option on a commodity futures contract is a legally binding agreement between two parties that gives the buyer, who pays a market determined price known as a "premium," the right (but not the obligation), within a specific time period, to exercise his option. Continue
Trading commodity futures and options is not for everyone. It is a volatile, complex, and risky business. Before you invest any money in futures or option contracts Continue
Day traders rapidly buy and sell stocks throughout the day in the hope that their stocks will continue climbing or falling in value for the seconds to minutes they own the stock, allowing them to lock in quick profits. Continue
When you place an order to buy or sell stock, you might not think about where or how your broker will execute the trade. But where and how your order is executed can impact the overall costs of the transaction, including the price you pay for the stock. Continue
While all investments involve risk, microcap stocks are among the most risky. Many microcap companies tend to be new and have no proven track record. Continue
Information is the investor's best tool when it comes to investing wisely. But accurate information about "microcap stocks" — low-priced stocks issued by the smallest of companies — may be difficult to find. Many microcap companies do not file financial reports with the SEC, so it's hard for investors to get the facts about the company's management, products, services, and finances. When reliable information is scarce, fraudsters can easily spread Continue
"Pre-IPO" investing involves buying a stake in a company before the company makes its initial public offering of securities. Many companies and stock promoters entice investors by promising an opportunity to make high returns by investing in a start-up enterprise at the ground floor level — often a new company that claims to be related to the Internet or e-commerce. But investing at the pre-IPO stage can involve significant risk for Continue
If you want to invest wisely and steer clear of frauds, you must get the facts. Never, ever, make an investment based solely on what you read in an online newsletter or bulletin board posting, especially if the investment involves a small, thinly-traded company that isn't well known. Continue
Find out whether the newsletter received payment to "tout" or recommend the stock and, if so, what it received and from whom. Read carefully what the newsletter says about payments it receives. Continue
You should be skeptical of investment opportunities you learn about through the Internet. When you see an offering on the Internet – whether it's on a company's website, in an online newsletter, on a message board, or in a chat room – you should assume it's a scam until you've done your homework and proven otherwise. Continue
With any investment, whether recommended in person, by mail, telephone, or on the Internet, you should always slow down, ask questions, and get written information. Continue